pic

Content page archive

Artificial Disc Replacement


Your vertebral discs age as you get older, and sometimes damaged, herniated discs can cause you a great deal of pain.

An artificial disc is a device that is inserted between your vertebrae to replace the original disc that is causing any pain.

Artificial disc replacement is one of the most successful treatments for spinal pain caused by herniated discs, bone spurs or failed surgery.

Is Artificial Disc Replacement right for me?

When pain medications, injections, and physical therapy have failed to provide you with relief for your vertebral pain first, you might talk with your doctor or make an appointment with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care for a consultation for additional treatment.

To determine if you are a good candidate for artificial disc replacement, you may require a few tests, including:

  • MRI Scans
  • Discography
  • CT Scans
  • X-rays

Artificial disc replacement is not appropriate for everyone who experiences spinal pain. You might be a candidate if you have the following:

  • Pain caused by one or more deteriorating spinal discs
  • No significant facet joint disease or compression on the spinal nerves
  • Body size that is not excessively overweight
  • No prior major surgery on the spine
  • No scoliosis (spine deformity)

Am I a candidate for Artificial Disc Replacement?

Most patients can expect the relief of pain and disability in the weeks to months following surgery.

Studies show that artificial disc replacement can improve your condition, but does not completely eliminate pain. Before your surgery, it is important to discuss your condition with your doctor.

If you would like to find out more about artificial disc replacement or have questions about your condition and possible treatment, make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein today!

Endoscopic Disectomy


An Endoscopic Discectomy is a minimally-invasive surgical procedure which removes a damaged or herniated disc from the spine. We aim to relieve pain that is cause by a herniated disc pressing on the nerve root or spinal cord in this procedure.

The surgery uses an endoscope to allow us a view of the affected disc and nerves and is performed through a surgical tube.

Is Endoscopic Disectomy right for me?

Herniated spinal discs can cause you to suffer from pain, discomfort, and numbness, symptoms which may extend from the back into the extremities, because of the herniated disc compressing your spinal nerves.

Sometimes we encounter patients at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care whose symptoms are so severe that their activity is limited. You should consult with your doctor if your symptoms are not relieved with conservative treatments like medication or physical therapy.

In an endoscopic discectomy, a small incision is made near the damaged area. A tube is then inserted and used to introduce an endoscope and minimally invasive instruments to remove the affected disc. Dr. Joseph Weinstein is able to see where your pinched nerve is, and remove the damaged disc.

Am I a candidate for Endoscopic Discectomy?

It is important to note that there is risk associate with all types of surgery, no matter how minimally invasive.

However, results from a endoscopic discectomy have shown to be comparable with more traditional surgeries, with the benefit being that there is less muscle trauma and blood loss for our patients.

A endoscopic discectomy can provide faster pain relief than nonsurgical treatment, but should not be considered until other, more conservative treatments have been tested. You should consult with your doctor to determine if an endoscopic discectomy is the best approach for your condition.

If you have questions about this procedure or would like to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein about your condition, make an appointment with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today!

Spinal Fusion


Spinal fusion is a type of surgery that fuses together two vertebrae to stabilize the bones and prevent further mobility in a section of the spin.

Modern spinal fusion surgery techniques use bone grafts or bone-stimulating proteins between each vertebrae to form bone growth that binds the bones together over time.

Spinal fusion helps to relieve symptoms of pain and stress in the spine that come from a number of spinal conditions or diseases. Spinal fusion prevents flexibility in one portion of the spine, which may impact other areas of the spine and back. Physical therapy helps to ensure that the recovery process after spinal fusion surgery is smooth and without additional complication.

Is Spinal Fusion Right for me?

Spinal fusion can help to relieve chronic pain in Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care patients, when more conservative treatments fail to provide lasting results. Spinal fusion may be recommended for patients suffering from:

  • Spondylolisthesis, a condition that occurs when one vertebra slips forward over another;
  • Spinal instability, as a result of degenerative diseases like arthritis;
  • Spinal deformities;
  • Vertebral fractures

Spinal fusion is typically performed alongside procedures like a discectomy (disc removal) or after laminectomy or foraminotomy, in which portions of the spine bone are removed. In some cases, spinal fusion may be recommended to help with stability in patients who have chronic, debilitating back pain for which no specific cause has been found.

The technique for performing a spinal fusion is dependent on the patient and their specific needs.

In spinal fusion, an incision is made over the spine, and muscles and other soft tissues are moved away from the surgical area to give the surgeon access to the spine. A bone graft is then placed between or around the vertebrae, and metal plates, screws or rods are implanted to keep the spine stable. The bone graft material fuses with your spine's vertebrae over the period of several months.

AM I A CANDIDATE FOR SPINAL FUSION?

Spinal fusion procedures have been well-researched and established, and we generally only recommend it when it's considered medically necessary to relieve symptoms that cannot be treated with conservative methods like physical therapy and medication.

Most procedures involve a hospital stay of two to three days this ensures that the surgically treated area has a chance to begin healing. During the recovery period, you are prescribed pain medication to relieve any discomfort, and sometimes a brace or soft cervical collar is used to keep your spine in alignment.

Strenuous physical activity is restricted for several weeks after the procedure, and physical therapy is recommended to help restore your strength and mobility. It takes several months for the bone grafts to completely fuse with the rest of the patient's spine.

If you have any questions about spinal fusion or would like to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care on your conditions, contact us today to make an appointment!

Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF)


Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a minimally invasive surgery used to remove a herniated or degenerative disc in the cervical portion of the spine. If you are experiencing neck pain symptoms and have not found relief from more conservative approaches to treatment, you might talk with your doctor or consult with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care about surgical options like ACDF.

Is ACDF Right for me?

ACDF is a procedure that involves both a discectomy, in which a vertebral disc is removed, and a spinal fusion, which allows for parts of the spinal bone to fuse together and provide more stability in your spine.

In the procedure, Dr. Joseph Weinstein makes a small incision in the throat area, and uses an endoscope to help guide small instruments into the surgical area. These instruments are used to remove the damaged disc and clean out the area between the vertebrae.

A bone graft is then inserted into the surgical area, and a metal plate is secured over the graft area. The bone graft is used to fuse the vertebrae together. Following surgery, your body begins its natural healing process and new bone cells grow around the graft. In 3 to 6 months, the bone graft should join the two vertebrae and form a solid bone structure.

Am I a candidate for ACDF?

All types of surgery can involve risk, no matter how minimally invasive. If you are experiencing neck pain, you should talk with your doctor about all of your treatment options, both non-surgical and surgical.

After a spinal fusion procedure, you may notice some loss of range-of-motion, but this can vary between patients.

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a well-established procedure and provided relief in most of our patients.

If you have any questions about the ACDF procedure or are experiencing symptoms that are painful, make an appointment to talk with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care team today.

Kyphoplasty


Kyphoplasty, also referred to as balloon kyphoplasty, is used to treat compression fractures in the spine. Kyphoplasty is a type of vertebral augmentation procedure, and is designed to stop pain caused by fracturing in the spine. Goals for the procedure include stabilizing the spine, and restoring at least some of the vertebral height or stability lost due to fracturing.

Is Kyphoplasty right for me?

Our patients who require kyphoplasty have suffered some kind of damage to their vertebra, usually a compression fracture. Compression fractures can be caused by weakened vertebrae due to aging, a spinal infection or tumor, or trauma to the spine.

During the procedure, Dr. Joseph Weinstein cuts a tiny incision in the back. A small balloon is inserted and filled to stabilize the area, and bone filler material is then injected into the space.

Am I a candidate for Kyphoplasty?

Kyphoplasty is a common procedure at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care with generally high success rates, in terms of relieving any pain that you might experience and providing stability to the fractured vertebra.

Because kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure, risks are considered lower when compared to more aggressive or open surgery.

There are risks and complications involved with any kind of surgery, however, including kyphoplasty. Kyphoplasty is an elective surgery, and itメs recommended that you talk with your surgeon and research the risks of the surgery, along with other methods for pain relief.

If you have questions about kyphoplasty or any other minimally invasive surgery at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, make an appointment for a consultation with us today.

This procedure restores the height of the vertebrae, alleviates pain in the area, and even improves posture. If you have questions about kyphoplasty, feel free to make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein for a consultation.

Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion


A transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is a specific type of posterior fusion surgical procedure (PLIF), with the distinction being the angle from which the spine is approached.

The surgery involves accessing the lower, or lumbar, portion of the spine through a small incision in the back, and inserting a bone graft between affected vertebrae, allowing your surgeon to fuse and providing stability in the spinal column.

Is TLIF right for me?

A transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion can be a more minimally invasive procedure, and is often less invasive than other spinal surgery procedures.

If you're experiencing instability in the lumbar region of the spine, suffer from degenerative disc disease, stenosis, or spondylolisthesis, you should consult with your doctor about the TLIF procedure. Surgical procedures should only be considered if conservative treatments have not provided you relief.

If you experience the following conditions, you should consult with your doctor:

  • Back pain
  • Numbness in the lower back, hip or legs
  • Sciatica

In a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedure, surgeons are able to use small incisions and less intrusive techniques than in a more traditional open spinal surgery.

In a TLIF, Dr. Joseph Weinstein makes an incision in the lower back, over the targeted area of the spinal vertebrae. The exterior roof of the spine, or lamina, is removed, along with any damaged vertebral disc material.

A bone graft and screws are then inserted to allow for fusion of the spinal bone.

Am I a candidate for TLIF?

When medication, physical therapy, and other conservative treatment approaches are not enough to help provide our patients with stability to the spinal column or relief from back pain, a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedure might be considered.

Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care patients can typically expect to spend 1-2 days in the hospital for the procedure. Many of our patient's symptoms are alleviated almost immediately after the procedure, and patients typically experience further improvement over time.

Strenuous activity like heavy lifting is to be avoided in the four to six weeks following the procedure. Each patient's case will vary, so consult your surgeon about your own surgery recovery plan.

All surgery carries some amount of risk, including infection, bleeding, blood clots, nerve damage, bowel and bladder complications. You should talk with your doctor about potential risks for a TLIF procedure.

If you have questions about the TLIF procedure or would like to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care team about your spinal condition, make an appointment to speak with us today!

Anterior Cervical Corpectomy


An anterior cervical corpectomy involves the anterior (from the front) removal of vertebrae in the cervical section of the spine.

If a spine disease involves more than just the disc or surrounding space, your spine surgeon may recommend removal of the vertebrae, as well as the disc spaces at either end, to allow for more room in the spinal canal. This is known as a corpectomy, which means removing the body.

Is an Anterior Cervical Corpectomy right for me?

If your spinal condition involves more than just the disc space, your spine surgeon may recommend a corpectomy. This involves removing the entirety of the vertebral body, including the disc spaces at the ends of the vertebra, in order to completely decompress the cervical portion of the spinal canal.

We perform this procedure for more extensive cervical stenosis, when your spinal cord is severely compressed (usually from bone spur growth).

The approach is similar to a discectomy, but the incisions may be used to allow for more extensive exposure. The spine surgeon then performs a corpectomy, removing the vertebral body (or bodies, if necessary). Sometimes the posterior longitudinal ligament is removed to allow further access to the cervical canal and to relieve more pressure on the spinal cord.

Once the vertebral body is removed, a cervical fusion is performed. Because the entire vertebral body has been removed, the doctor fills the space with bone from another part of the body the pelvis or leg bones, for instance. Using a bone graft in this empty space holds the remaining vertebrae apart, and when the bone heals it causes the vertebrae to fuse together.

Am I a Candidate for Anterior Cervical Corpectomy?

Surgically speaking, a corpectomy is a more difficult spine procedure to perform. The procedure is similar to a discectomy, but because the corpectomy is a more extensive surgery, risks are statistically greater. Risks of the surgery can include:

  • Damage to the nerve root or spinal cord
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Graft dislodgment
  • Damage to the trachea/esophagus

Please note that Dr. Joseph Weinstein only recommends corpectomy surgeries in circumstances of severe spinal cord issues. These issues place the cord at greater risk surgical complications, regardless of how skilled or experienced your surgeon might be.

If you would like to know more about anterior cervical corpectomy contact Comprehensive Orthopedic & Spine Care team about your condition, make an appointment today!

Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion


Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a minimally invasive surgery that approaches the spine from the anterior (front) of the body, in order to remove all or part of a herniated disc from the lumbar portion of the spine, then fusing the vertebrae together to give the spine stability.

We use this type of spinal procedure at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care to alleviate symptoms in patients suffering from herniated discs, fractured vertebrae, spondylolisthesis, or instability of the spine.

Is ALIF right for me?

If you are experiencing lower back or leg pain, scoliosis, or other spinal instability, you might consider the anterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure, if you have not found relief with non-surgical treatments.

We do not recommend this procedure for patients with bones that have become soft due to osteoporosis, or in patients with arthritis or excessive spinal instability.

During the procedure the patient is put under general anesthesia, and the surgeon makes a tiny incision in the patient's abdomen, and inserts an endoscope to view the surgical area. Minimally invasive surgical tools are advanced through a tube to remove all or part of the damaged vertebral discs. Bone graft material is inserted into the disc space between the vertebral bodies, allowing for the spine to fuse.

Am I a candidate for ALIF?

The ALIF procedure is not usually recommended for patients suffering from osteoporosis or excessive spinal instability.

If you have not found relief through non-surgical, more conservative treatment plans, you may want to talk with their doctor or make an appointment with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care to talk about ALIF. All surgeries come with risk, so itメs a good idea to discuss options with someone you trust.

An endoscopic, minimally-invasive procedure like ALIF means quicker recovery and faster relief from painful symptoms. Many of our ALIF procedures at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care are outpatient, allowing for many patients to go home the same day. Patients will be required to undergo physical therapy and may require a pain medication prescription to help with any initial discomfort. It takes several months for the bone grafts to completely fuse with the rest of the patient's spine.

If you have questions about ALIF or have symptoms that you would like to address, make an appointment for a consultation with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today. Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team look forward to helping you!

Endoscopic Facectomy


An endoscopic facetectomy is a procedure that uses minimally invasive techniques to remove spine growth resulting from facet disease.

In most of our patients at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, the endoscopic technique is preferred over a more traditional open surgery, because the recovery time is generally faster and the procedure requires less invasive surgical techniques.

Is Endoscopic Facectomy right for me?

There are several spinal conditions that can cause facet disease, the most common including degenerative disc disease and facet joint syndrome. The natural process of aging, injuries, or excessive wear-and-tear can also be contributing factors to the condition.

If you are experiencing the following symptoms, or your condition has not improved with more conservative treatments, you should talk with your doctor or make an appointment with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care about an endoscopic facetectomy procedure:

  • Radiating pain
  • Pain that persists for three months or longer
  • Limited mobility in the neck or back
  • Weakness, tingling or numbness in the extremities
  • Difficulty performing regular daily activities without pain

The minimally-invasive, endoscopic approach to a facetectomy allows for a surgeon to remove a small portion of bone, relieving pressure on nerves and other spinal structures. If necessary, other surgical procedures may be performed alongside the facetectomy to treat any other conditions that might exacerbate nerve compression or impingement.

Am I Candidate for Endoscopic Facectomy?

A facetectomy relieves pressure on your spinal nerves and blood vessels, which helps to provide relief from pain, numbness, and other symptoms. Dr. Joseph Weinstein uses the endoscopic approach because it can be performed as an outpatient procedure, and typically our patients are able to leave the hospital on the same day as the procedure.

All surgeries come with some kind of risk, so you should consider more conservative treatments for your condition. If you are suffering from chronic pain, weakness or numbness, and non-surgical treatments have not provided relief for your condition, you may want to discuss endoscopic facetectomy with your doctor.

If you have questions about your condition, are experiencing pain, or want to know more about minimally-invasive surgical treatments, make an appointment for a consultation with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today. We look forward to helping you!

Endoscopic Rhizotomy


Endoscopic rhizotomy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that can help lessen chronic back and neck pain.

The procedure uses an endoscope, or tube with a camera on the end of it, to view the affected area. During the procedure, the surgeon deadens a small section of nerves around the facet joints of the spine to provide pain relief for the patient.

Is Endoscopic Rhizotomy right for me?

The endoscopic rhizotomy procedure can be effective in relieving chronic back and neck pain that a patient experiences, typically from conditions like facet joint syndrome, spondylosis, or osteoarthritis.

If conservative treatments like pain medication, hot and cold therapy, or physical therapy are not alleviating your symptoms, you might consider surgical treatments as an option.

In an endoscopic rhizotomy, the surgeon makes a small incision in the surgical area, and uses an endoscope to view the affected area. A narrow radiofrequency probe is used to deaden the small section of nerve fibers causing the pain.

Am I a candidate for Endoscopic Rhizotomy?

As with all surgical procedures, there are risks to consider, and complications may occur. Discuss all of your treatment options with your doctor, so you are aware of the risks and benefits of these procedures.

The endoscopic rhizotomy procedure is minimally invasive, and performed on an outpatient basis. Recovery typically takes only a few weeks. Pain medication may be prescribed during the recovery period, and physical therapy is recommended as a follow up to the procedure to help the patient gain back strength and mobility.

If you have questions about your condition, if your symptoms worsen, or you would like to find out more about minimally-invasive surgical treatments at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, make an appointment for a consultation with us. We look forward to helping you!

Laminoforaminotomy Decompression


A lamino-foraminotomy decompression is a procedure that uses minimally invasive techniques that expand the space in the spine by removing parts of the laminae and foramina within the vertebra. Foramina are the openings in each vertebra through which the spinal cord and other nerves pass. Laminae form the back side of the spine and make a モroofヤ for the spinal cord.

Is Lamino-Foraminotomy Decompression right for me?

There are several spinal conditions that you might experience that can cause changes in the spine, the most common being herniated discs, degenerative disc complications, facet joint syndrome and spondylosis. Aging, injury or excessive wear-and-tear can also contribute to your condition.

Talk with your doctor or make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein about a lamino-foraminotomy decompression procedure if you are experiencing the following symptoms:

  • Radiating pain
  • Pain that persists longer than a few months
  • Limited mobility in the neck or back
  • Weakness, tingling or numbness in the extremities
  • Difficulty performing regular daily activities without pain

The endoscopic approach to a decompression procedure allows for Dr. Joseph Weinstein to remove a small portion of bone in the spinal foramina and lamina, which helps to relieve pressure on nerves and other spinal structures. If necessary, Dr. Joseph Weinstein may perform other surgical procedures alongside the decompression to treat any other conditions.

In most of our patients, the endoscopic technique is preferred over a more traditional open back surgery, because recovery time is faster and the procedure requires less invasive surgical techniques.

Am I candidate for Laminoforaminotomy Decompression?

A lamino-foraminotomy decompression provides relief on your spinal nerves and blood vessels, which helps to relieve pain and numbness. We use this endoscopic approach at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care as an outpatient procedure, and typically patients are able to leave the same day as their procedure.

All surgeries come with some kind of risk, so you should first consider more conservative treatments for your condition. If your condition worsens, however, you may want to consult with your doctor.

Contact us today for an appointment to discuss minimally invasive surgical treatments like lamino-foraminotomy decompression. We look forward to helping you.

Lumbar Laminectomy


Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care offers Lumbar laminectomy as a treatment option in Manhattan and Flushing Queens. We use state-of-the-art approaches to relieve pain and other symptoms. Lumbar laminectomy, also known as decompression laminectomy, is a spinal surgery done to relieve excess pressure on the spinal nerve(s) in the lumbar (low back) region.

The term laminectomy originated from the Latin words lamina refers to a thin plate and the word ectomy means removal. The purpose of laminectomy is removal of the lamina or roof of the vertebra so as to provide enough space for the nerves to exit the spinal canal (decompression).

Indications for a Lumbar Laminectomy

Spinal stenosis is one of the major indications for lumbar laminectomy. It is a condition of narrowing of spinal canal due to arthritic changes of facet joints and intervertebral discs. This causes enlargement of the joint that exerts pressure on the spinal nerves.

Symptoms of nerve impingement are back pain or radiating pain into the hips, buttocks or legs, numbness or tingling sensation and muscle weakness in the back and lower extremities.

Lumbar Laminectomy Procedure

Lumbar laminectomy is usually performed under general anesthesia. In this technique, the patient lies face down on the operating table. A small incision is made along the midline of the back. To have a clear view of the spine, the surgeon slowly retracts the soft tissues and muscles. A part of or the entire lamina is removed to eliminate the pressure on the nerve roots. In addition, other sources of compression such as bone spur or damaged disc is removed to relieve the symptoms. At the end of the procedure, the surgeon realigns the soft tissues and the incision is closed.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care specialize in Lumbar laminectomy in Manhattan and Flushing as a treatment that can provide relief, especially if you have experienced symptoms for a longer period of time.

If youメd like to discuss lumbar laminectomy as a treatment option to relieve your pain, make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we look forward to helping you!

Laser Discectomy


Laser discectomy is a minimally invasive outpatient surgical procedure that provides patients with relief from pain due to herniated discs and spinal stenosis. The procedure uses lasers to vaporize a small portion of the gel-like interior of an intervertebral disc, which reduces the volume of a damaged disc and any pressure caused by bulging or herniation.

The procedure is known to be minimally invasive and is considered an effective treatment for chronic back and extremity pain.

Is Laser Discectomy right for me?

At Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, the laser discectomy procedure is performed on patients who have not found relief from herniated disc pain through conservative treatments.

Patients with chronic pain conditions, where spinal fusion is not recommended, are often good candidates for laser discectomy. If youメre experiencing pain from herniated or bulging vertebral discs and non-surgical treatments have not alleviated your symptoms, you might talk to your doctor about a laser discectomy. You can also consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care team on the procedure.

During the laser discectomy procedure, a small incision is made, and a tube is then inserted into the spine for imaging and surgery. Portions of herniated discs can be removed using laser technology, and small bulges or tears can be repaired in this kind of treatment.

Am I a candidate for Laser Discectomy?

As with any kind of surgery, there are some risks involved. You should consult with your doctor about any kind of treatment for spinal pain.

Laser discectomy techniques allow surgeons to remove a portion of the vertebral disc compressing the nerve, without requiring a traditional open back surgery, and without altering the stability of the spine.

Laser discectomy procedures have a higher patient satisfaction rate and faster recovery times than traditional open back surgery.

If you are interested in knowing more about laser discectomy or would like to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care about your spinal condition, make an appointment today! We look forward to helping you.

Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation


A pedicle screw is used in spinal surgery to act as an anchor point for rods used in surgery. In lumbar pedicle screw fixation, the screws are placed at two or three adjoining spine segments, and are connected with a rod between them. This construct provides a stable environment for spinal fusion of the segments, and allows for immediate stability of the spine and quicker recovery for the patient.

Is Lumbar Pedicle Screw fixation right for me?

There are several reasons that you might experience instability of the spine, including degenerative disease, trauma, or cancer. The decreased stability can cause a number of different complications, and the integrity of your spine is compromised. The condition can also cause pain during normal, everyday activities.

When conservative treatments like physical therapy or medication fail to provide relief or stability to the spinal region, the structural integrity of the spine can be restored through a stabilization surgery.

Lumbar pedicle screw fixation is a procedure intended to eliminate movement across the unstable portion of the spine and relieve pain. Fixation provides you with immediate stability, by inserting metallic pedicle screws into the spine segments, which are then connected by metallic rods. Long-term stability is achieved through the fusion of these segments.

Am I a Candidate for Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation?

When treatments like medication and physical therapy are not enough to help provide stability to the spinal column, your doctor might recommend a lumbar pedicle screw fixation procedure.

Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care patients can expect to spend two to three days in the hospital for the procedure. Pain medication is administered following the surgery, along with physical therapy to help you return to their normal daily activities.

Strenuous activity is to be avoided in the four to six weeks following the procedure, then increased depending on your tolerance. Physical therapy and patient evaluations are a part of the follow up for this procedure, to monitor the progression of bone fusion.

If you have any questions about lumbar pedicle screw fixation or your spinal condition, make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today! We look forward to helping you.

Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion


A posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a surgical procedure that removes any damaged disc material found in the spine, and inserting a bone graft between two vertebrae to provide stability to the spine and relief from pain. Posterior means that this surgical method approaches the spine from the back of the body. Lumbar refers to the lower section of the patients spine.

Is Plif Right for me?

The Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion can be a minimally invasive procedure, and is often less invasive than other spinal fusion procedures.

If you are experiencing instability in the lumbar region of the spine, degenerative disc disease, stenosis, or spondylolisthesis, you should consult with their doctor about the PLIF procedure if conservative treatments do not provide relief.

If you are suffering from back pain, numbness in the lower back or legs, or sciatica, you might also talk with your doctor about the procedure. You can make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care team to discuss any questions that you might have.

In a posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure, Dr. Joseph Weinstein is able to use small incisions and less intrusive techniques than in an open spinal surgery.

In a PLIF, an incision is made in the lower back, over the targeted area of the spinal vertebrae. The exterior roof of the spine, or lamina, is removed, along with any vertebral disc material.

A bone graft and screws are then inserted to allow for fusion of the spinal bone.

AM I A CANDIDATE FOR PLIF?

When more conservative treatments like medication and physical therapy are not enough to help provide stability to the spinal column or relief from back pain, Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care might recommend a posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure.

Patients can expect to spend 1-2 days in the hospital for the procedure. Pain medication is administered following the surgery, along with physical therapy to help the patient return to their normal daily activities. Many of our patients symptoms should be alleviated almost immediately after the procedure, and patients typically see symptoms improving over time.

Strenuous activity like heavy lifting is to be avoided in the four to six weeks following the procedure. Each patient's case will vary, so consult your surgeon about your own surgery recovery plan.

All surgery carries some amount of risk, including infection, bleeding, blood clots, nerve damage, bowel and bladder complications. You should talk with your doctor about potential risks for a PLIF procedure.

Vertebroplasty


Vertebroplasty is a procedure that treats spinal fractures typically caused by osteoporosis.

During this minimally invasive procedure, Dr. Joseph Weinstein makes a tiny incision in the patientメs back and injects bone filler material into the fractured vertebrae, which restores the stability and structure of the spinal vertebra.

Vertebroplasty is not recommended for all of our patients with fractured vertebrae, but may be considered in patients who have not seen results from more conservative treatments, and need a solution for improving posture and mobility and alleviating their pain.

Is Vertebroplasty right for me?

Vertebroplasty is a procedure that we recommend only for patients who have suffered some kind of damage to their vertebra, usually a compression fracture.

Compression fractures can be caused by weakened vertebrae due to osteoporosis, aging, spinal infection, or trauma to the spine.

During this minimally invasive surgery, Dr. Joseph Weinstein cuts a small incision in the back, and then injects bone filler material into the damaged vertebral space. This procedure restores the height of your vertebrae, alleviates pain in the area, and can help to improve your posture.

Am I a candidate for Vertebroplasty?

Vertebroplasty is a common procedure with high success rates, in terms of relieving pain that you might experience and providing stability to the spine.

Because vertebroplasty is performed as a minimally invasive procedure at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, risks are considered lower when compared to more aggressive or open surgery.

There are risks and complications involved with any kind of surgery, including vertebroplasty. Vertebroplasty is an elective surgery, and you should talk with your surgeon and research the risks of the surgery, along with other methods for pain relief in the spine.

If you'd like to know more about vertebroplasty or would like to discuss your condition and possible treatment options with us, make an appointment for a consultation with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today.

Vertebral Augmentation


There are several kinds of procedures that fall into the category of vertebral augmentation. Vertebral augmentation describes any procedure that is used to stabilize a damaged vertebra. Vertebral augmentation procedures include: vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, or radiofrequency vertebral augmentation. Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care employs these types of procedures to help relieve pain and stabilize the patient's spine.

Is Vertebral Augmentation right for me?

Most patients who require vertebral augmentation have suffered damage to their vertebra, usually a compression fracture. Compression fractures can be caused by minor trauma to your spine, weakened vertebrae caused by the aging process, a spinal infection or tumor, or more serious trauma to your spine (from a serious accident/fall).

All vertebral augmentation procedures at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care whether it's vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, or radiofrequency vertebral augmentation involve minimally invasive surgery. These procedures involve injecting bone cement inside of the damaged vertebra. This builds an internal cast inside the bone. The result is a more stable vertebra and spine section, and relief from pain.

Am I a candidate for Vertebral Augmentation?

Vertebral augmentation is common procedure at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care with generally high success rates, in terms of relieving the patient's pain and stabilizing the area where the fracture occurs. Because these are minimally invasive procedures, risks are considered lower when compared to more aggressive or open surgery.

As with all surgeries, there are risks and complications involved with any kind of vertebral augmentation procedures. Vertebral augmentation is an elective surgery. It is recommended that you talk with your surgeon and research the risks of the surgery, along with other methods for pain relief.

Make an appointment to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care about your treatment options today.

Endoscopic Fusion


Endoscopic fusion is type of minimally invasive spinal surgery technique that uses an endoscope, or tube with a small camera at the end of it, to view the internal anatomy and access the spine.

Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care uses this procedure to fuse together two vertebrae to provide a patient's spine with additional stability and prevents further motion between the two bones. This minimally invasive endoscopic approach lessens soft tissue injury normally experienced during traditional open back surgery, allowing for a quicker recovery time.

Is Endoscopic Fusion right for me?

Endoscopic spinal fusion helps to relieve a patientメs chronic pain when more conservative approaches aren't able to relieve a patient's symptoms. Dr. Joseph Weinstein may recommend this procedure for patients who experience:

  • Spondylolisthesis, a condition that occurs when one vertebra slips forward over another
  • Spinal instability, as a result of degenerative diseases like arthritis
  • Spinal deformities
  • Vertebral fractures

Endoscopic fusion is often performed alongside procedures like a discectomy (disc removal) or after laminectomy or foraminotomy. Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care may recommend endoscopic fusion to help with spinal stability in patients who have chronic, debilitating back pain for which no specific cause has been found.

In an endoscopic fusion, an incision is made over the spine, and Dr. Joseph Weinstein inserts an endoscope, or tube with a small camera at the end of it, into the surgical area. This allows him to view the affected area and gives them access the spine. A bone graft is then placed between or around the vertebrae, and metal plates, screws or rods are implanted to keep the spine stable. The bone graft material fuses with your spine's vertebrae over the period of several months.

Am I a candidate for Endoscopic Fusion?

Endoscopic fusion is a well-established procedure at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, but is generally only recommended when it's considered medically necessary to relieve our patients symptoms. If your condition cannot be treated with conservative methods like physical therapy and medication, you may want to talk to your doctor about a surgical option for treatment.

Most procedures involve a hospital stay of a couple of days this ensures that the surgically treated area has a chance to start the healing process. Pain medication may be prescribed to relieve your discomfort, and a brace or soft cervical collar may be used to keep the spine aligned.

Strenuous physical activity is restricted for several weeks after the procedure, and physical therapy is recommended to help restore mobility and strength in the spine. It can take several months for the bone grafts to completely fuse with the rest of your spine.

If you have questions about endoscopic fusion or would like to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein on your spinal condition, please contact us today to set up an appointment!

Endoscopic Foraminotomy


An endoscopic foraminotomy is a procedure using minimally invasive techniques that expand the intervertebral foramina. Foramina are the tiny openings in each spinal vertebra through which the spinal cord, artery and other nerves pass.

In most patients, the endoscopic technique is preferred over a more traditional open surgery, because the recovery time is generally faster and the procedure requires less invasive surgical techniques.

Is Endoscopic Foraminotomy right for me?

There are several spinal conditions that you might experience that can cause changes in the spinal foramina, the most common being herniated discs, degenerative disc complications, facet joint syndrome and spondylosis. The natural process of aging, injury or excessive wear-and-tear can also be contributing factors to your condition.

If you are experiencing the following symptoms, or your condition has not improved with more conservative treatments, you should talk with your doctor about an endoscopic foraminotomy procedure:

  • Radiating pain
  • Pain that persists for three months or longer
  • Limited mobility in the neck or back
  • Weakness, tingling or numbness in the extremities
  • Difficulty performing regular daily activities without pain

The minimally-invasive, endoscopic approach to a foraminotomy allows for Dr. Joseph Weinstein to remove a small amount of bone in the spinal foramina, relieving pressure on nerves and other spinal structures. If necessary, Dr. Joseph Weinstein may perform other surgical procedures alongside the foraminotomy to treat any other conditions that might exacerbate nerve compression.

Am I candidate for Endoscopic Foraminotomy?

A foraminotomy relieves pressure on spinal nerves and blood vessels, which helps to provide a patient relief from pain, numbness, and other symptoms. We use this endoscopic approach at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care as an outpatient procedure, and typically our patients are able to leave on the same day as the procedure.

All surgeries come with some kind of risk, so you should consider more conservative treatments for your condition. If you are suffering from chronic pain, weakness or numbness, and non-surgical treatments have not provided relief for your condition, you may want to discuss endoscopic foraminotomy with your doctor.

Contact us today for an appointment to discuss minimally invasive surgical treatments like endoscopic foraminotomy we look forward to hearing from you!

Shoulder Procedures


Shoulder injuries can be painful, but you have a number of options when it comes to pain relief and shoulder procedures. Regional anesthesia (peripheral nerve blocks) has a number of advantages over general anesthesia and using postoperative opioids alone. Talk to your surgeon and anesthesiologist to determine what pain relief options are best for you based on your individual medical situation.

The shoulder is the most flexible joint in our body. Its flexibility allows us to move and rotate the arm in many positions: to the front, above, to the side, and behind your body. The area where the humerus (upper arm bone) fits into the scapula (shoulder blade) forms the shoulder joint. The shoulder is absolutely essential for the movement of the upper part of your body and every possible injury should be examined by an orthopedic shoulder doctor.

There are three important bones in the shoulder:

  • Acromion bony projection off the scapula
  • Clavicle (collarbone) meets the acromion in the acromioclavicular joint
  • Cracoid process hook-like bony projection from the scapula

Besides these three important bones, the shoulder joint consists of three important bone structures as well:

  • Rotator cuff it is formed of muscles and tendons that surround the shoulder. The rotator cuff's main function is to support shoulder's stability and allow a wide range motion
  • Bursa a small fluid sac that protects the tendons of the rotator cuff
  • Labrum it forms a cup for the humerus's head to fit into

Shoulder Procedures

Arthroscopic SLAP Repair


This arthroscopic shoulder surgery is performed to repair a tear of the biceps tendon at the point where it connects to the labrum, a ring of cartilage that surrounds the shoulder socket. A tear at this point is called a SLAP (Superior Labrum Anterior-Posterior) tear. Arthroscopic SLAP repair is performed under general and regional anesthesia, and patients usually leave the hospital the same day.

Flow of the Arthroscopic SLAP Repair

Accessing the joint

The patient is positioned, and the shoulder is cleaned and sterilized. The shoulder surgeon creates a few small incisions in the shoulder. An arthroscopic camera is inserted through one of the incisions. The others will be used as access points for other arthroscopic tools.

Implanting the anchors

After any loose bits of tissue are removed, the surgeon drills a small hole into the glenoid bone where the labrum has torn away. A tiny anchor tied to a suture is implanted in the glenoid bone. Some tears may be repaired with just one anchor, others require multiple anchors.

Repairing the labrum

The surgeon ties the sutures around the torn labrum, reattaching it firmly to the glenoid. If the tendon cannot be repaired, it is released.

End of procedure and aftercare

The instruments are removed and the incisions are closed and bandaged. Patients generally require a sling for two to four weeks after this shoulder surgery. Physical therapy will be required to strengthen the joint. Most patients can regain normal activities within three to six months.

Shoulder Impingement Surgery


This outpatient shoulder surgery relieves pain by decompressing the tight space around the rotator tendon of the shoulder joint. The surgeon removes the bursa and trims back the acromion bone to allow for normal pain-free motion. In most cases, this procedure is performed arthroscopically.

Flow of the Shoulder Impingement Surgery

Incisions made

The surgeon creates three small incisions in the shoulder to access the joint. A thin metal tube is inserted in one incision. Fluid is pumped through the tube and into the joint. This expands the joint giving the surgeon a clear view and room to work.

Arthroscope Inserted

An arthroscope, which contains a light and a small video camera, is inserted into another incision. This gives the surgeon a clear view of the joint and the hooked acromion.

Swollen tissue removed

With the video images from the arthroscope as a guide, the surgeon inserts surgical instruments through the third incision. The swollen bursa tissue is removed.

Ligament cut

Another surgical tool is inserted to cut away the impinging coracoacromial ligament.

Bone shaved away

The hooked portion of the acromion bone is shaved away, opening up the space above the supraspinatus tendon.

End of the shoulder impingement surgery

After the joint is drained and the instruments removed, the surgeon closes the incisions with sutures or tape and the shoulder is bandaged. Physical therapy will begin within few days to help restore the shoulder to its full function.

Shoulder Arthritis Debridement


This minimally-invasive shoulder surgery is used to remove tissue in the shoulder joint that has been damaged from arthritis, overuse or injury. The shoulder surgeon uses a small camera, called an arthroscope, which is inserted into the shoulder joint.

Preparation for the Shoulder Debridement

The patient is positioned so that the shoulder is clearly visible to the surgeon and the area is cleaned and sterilized. Local anesthesia is administered to numb the injection site and a sedative is provided to relax the patient. General anesthesia may sometimes be used.

Accessing the shoulder

The surgeon creates a series of small incisions around the shoulder and inserts an arthroscopic camera and other tools. The camera allows the surgeon to view the procedure on a monitor.

Examining the joint

The surgeon injects fluid into the space around the shoulder socket to expand the joint and provide a clear view. The surgeon carefully examines the joint, to look for signs of damage. Once the shoulder has been diagnosed the shoulder surgeon may use one or more of the arthroscopic tools to repair any damage.

Repairing the damage

Bone spurs may be filed down and loose or damaged cartilage may be removed.

End of the shoulder arthritis debridement

The incisions are closed with sutures or surgical staples. The shoulder is bandaged. The patient would be given pain relievers and should be able to leave the hospital within a day.

Reattach itself to the humerus bone

Schedule an appointment today with Dr. Joseph Weinstein in our Flushing, Queens office or on the Upper East side in Manhattan to discuss treatment options for shoulder arthritis.

Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair


Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Overview

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is used to inspect and reattach torn tendons in the shoulderメs rotator cuff. The initial part of this shoulder surgery is performed arthroscopically through small tubes. In some cases, open shoulder surgery may be needed to repair large tears.

Flow of the arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery

Joint inspected

The shoulder surgeon inserts a small video camera called an arthroscope through tiny incisions in the shoulder to inspect the damaged joint.

Joint debrided

The surgeon removes any loose fragments of tendon or other debris from the damaged cuff tendon in the joint. This procedure, called debridement, is usually performed arthroscopically. Afterwards, the surgeon inspects the tissue damage in the joint and determines if more surgery is needed.

Acromion may be smoothed

If bone spurs have formed on the bottom of the acromion, the surgeon uses a rasp-like tool to smooth the area. This is called subacromial decompression, or smoothing, and will keep the acromion from pinching down on the supraspinatus tendon. It is usually done arthroscopically.

Rotator cuff inspected

If no tear is found in the rotator cuff area, the shoulder surgery may end here. If the surgeon finds a torn rotator cuff tendon, the type of repair needed is based on the size and severity of the tear. Small to moderate tears may be repaired arthroscopically. Open rotator cuff surgery may be needed to repair large tears. First, the torn end of the tendon is cleaned up. Next, an area on the humerus is cleared.

Anchors placed

The surgeon uses a drill or sharp tool to create one or more small holes in the bone. Anchors are then placed into the holes. The anchors hold stitches in place on the arm bone.

Tendon sutured

The tear in the tendon is stitched together. The sutures are pulled tightly against the anchors, reattaching the tendon to the humerus.

End of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

After rotator cuff surgery, the arm is usually placed in a sling. Physical therapy will be needed to regain full range of motion and increased shoulder strength. Over time, the tendon will naturally reattach itself to the humerus bone.

Dislocated Shoulder


Dislocated Shoulder Overview

A dislocated shoulder is a shoulder injury in which the ball of the shoulder pops out of the cup-shaped socket. When that happens, the soft tissues, ligaments, and nerves around the ball may get damaged as well. Once the ball of the shoulder goes back in the socket, the soft tissues will still be injured. Therefore, the shoulder needs to be properly examined and adequately treated.

Causes of Dislocated Shoulder

The shoulder is the body's most mobile joint, which allows for a very wide range of movements. This makes the shoulder joint very susceptible to dislocation as well as other injuries.

Most often, a shoulder dislocation occurs when a patient experiences some type of trauma or forceful motion during exercise, sports, a fall, or another form of accident or injury. It is important to note that some patients are naturally more loose-jointed than others, which makes them more vulnerable and, thus, more susceptible to shoulder dislocation.

Once a dislocated shoulder injury occurs, there is a probability that it will happen again.

Symptoms of Dislocated Shoulder

Shoulder dislocation is a painful injury that may cause a physically visible deformity. Other symptoms that patients may experience when they sustain this type of shoulder injury include swelling, bruising, numbness, weakness, tingling, and instability.

Treatment of Dislocated Shoulder

When a dislocated shoulder occurs, a physical exam will be performed in order to determine whether the shoulder is back in place. If it's not, an orthopedic doctor will perform a reduction. After that, some imaging will be done, including an X-ray, and an MRI scan. If the dislocated shoulder is chronic or has occurred more than once, a special type of MRI called and MR arthrogram should be performed.

Depending on the results of the scans, an orthopedic doctor will develop the proper treatment strategy, and determine whether surgery is required. Usually, if a patient is over the age of 25-30, doesn't perform a lot of sports, and has sustained a shoulder dislocation from a fall or an accident, conservative treatment that includes physical therapy and rehabilitation may be sufficient. In younger patients who are physically active and at risk for recurrent shoulder dislocations, then surgery may be recommended in order to restore normal motion and function, and repair any soft tissue damage.

Biceps Tenodesis


Biceps Tenodesis Overview

This minimally-invasive shoulder surgery is used to repair a rupture or ? partial tear of the biceps tendon in the shoulder, or to treat chronic tendinitis. With the biceps tenodesis surgery, the Long Head of Biceps (LHB) tendon is reattached to the top of the humerus, relieving pain and discomfort and restoring stability and strength to the arm.

Flow of the biceps tenodesis procedure

Preparation for the shoulder surgery

The patient is positioned so that the front of the shoulder is clearly visible to the surgeon, and the area is cleaned and sterilized. Local anesthesia is administered to numb the injection site and a sedative is provided to relax the patient. General anesthesia may sometimes be used.

Accessing the shoulder

The shoulder surgeon creates two small incisions on the shoulder and inserts an arthroscopic camera and arthroscopic scissors. The camera allows the surgeon to view the procedure on a monitor.

Releasing the tendon

Arthroscopic scissors are used to remove the damaged portion of the LHB tendon at the scapula. A small incision is made in the front of the shoulder and the top of the tendon is retrieved through the whole. Any damaged portions of the tendon are removed.

Repairing the tendon

The tendon is placed back into the shoulder joint and the top is positioned over the top of the humerus. A small hole is drilled into the humerus and the end of the LHB tendon is placed into the hole. The surgical fixation screw is inserted into the hole over the tendon to hold the tendon in place.

End of the biceps tenodesis surgery

The incisions are closed with sutures or surgical staples, the shoulder is bandaged, the patient will be given pain relievers and patients should be able to leave the hospital within a day. After the biceps tenodesis surgery, physical therapy will be required.

Meniscus Repair


Meniscus Repair Overview

The meniscus is a band of cartilage in the knee that acts as a shock absorber and provides stability to the knee joint. The meniscus helps protect the articular cartilage, the smooth covering on the ends of the femur and tibia. If meniscus tears, it can often be repaired through arthroscopic knee surgery.

Arthroscope inserted

Small incisions are made in the front and back of the knee. A tiny video camera called an arthroscope is inserted into the joint. Surgical instruments may be inserted through the other incisions. After finding and inspecting the area of damage, the surgeon decides how to treat the damage.

Fragments removed

The damaged area is cleared of loose fragments. If the tear is located in an area of the meniscus that does not receive a good blood supply, that portion of the meniscus may be removed completely.

Meniscus tears repaired

Tears that are in an area of the meniscus with a good blood supply are usually repairable because the blood supply promotes healing. The surgeon uses sutures or special fasteners known as anchors to sew or anchor the torn edges of a meniscus together. The meniscus will then heal itself.

End of procedure and after care

Following meniscus repair, the incisions are closed with sutures or small bandages and the knee is wrapped and iced to control swelling. The knee may be immobilized for several weeks before rehabilitation begins. If part of the meniscus was removed, weight-bearing and rehabilitation may begin soon after this minimally-invasive knee surgery.

Bulging Disc New York


At Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we encourage those with a bulging disc to undergo conservative treatments once pain or other troubling symptoms begin. If conservative treatment methods have failed you and you are tired of living with the constant pain and other symptoms from one or more bulging discs the expert team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care can help.

There's no need to suffer through progressively worsening back pain and loss of muscle function. The expert team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care can perform a variety of surgical procedures using minimally invasive techniques to provide the best possible outcomes for long-term relief from a bulging disc.

How do I know If I have a Bulging Disc?

A bulging disc can be caused by a number of different factors, including injury or trauma. Any situation that impacts the spine can cause compression of the discs and nerves, which can result in the discs bulging.

When the gel-like center of your spinal disc is pushed against the disc's harder outer layer, this causes a bulging disc. If some of the fluid from the disc leaks out, that pain can become more intense and cause the disc to herniate.

Any condition which adds pressure to the spine can cause a bulging disc to form, including obesity, remaining sedentary, lifting heavy items, and repetitive motion. The natural process of aging can also cause bulging discs to form in the spine, as a result of the weakening of discs.

It can be difficult to tell if you're experiencing abulging disc, because there are not always obvious symptoms or pain. You can make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care to discuss the best kind of treatment for your condition.

What is the right treatment for me?

Many patients may have success with more conservative treatments like cortisone injections or physical therapy.

It is not often that Dr. Joseph Weinstein recommends surgery to relieve symptoms for bulging discs, but if you have tried at-home treatments or more conservative methods and are still experiencing symptoms, you may want to seriously consider surgery.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care specialize in innovative, minimally-invasive surgical treatments that can provide relief for your condition, especially if you have experienced symptoms for a longer period of time.

If you'd like to discuss possible treatments and the best course of action to relieve your pain, make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we look forward to helping you!

Cervical Radiculopathy


Cervical radiculopathy is a painful condition that occurs when the nerves in the cervical portion of the spine become compressed.

Symptoms are usually caused by a pinched or irritated nerve in the neck causing pain that radiates into the chest or arm area.

How do I know if I have Cervical Radiculopathy?

People who experience cervical radiculopathy typically feel pain, weakness or numbness in the areas served by the irritated or compressed nerve. You might experience pain in a single location, like the shoulder, or it can spread along the entire arm.

The intensity and kind of pain that comes with cervical radiculopathy can vary. Some of our patients at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care describe a dull and all-over pain; others describe the pain as severe or sharp.

Certain neck movements (bending or rotating the neck) may increase your pain. Some people report that pain decreases when they place a hand behind their head this may provide relief from the pressure on the nerve root which can lessen pain and irritation.

What Is the Right Treatment for me?

Cervical radiculopathy may be treated in a number of ways either conservatively, through exercise and stretching, or if your condition is severe or worsens, surgery might need to be considered.

If you're not able to find relief from your symptoms using conservative treatments like stretching, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication or steroid injections, Dr. Joseph Weinstein might recommend surgery to help decompress the spine and relieve pressure.

Surgical treatment options may include lamino-foraminotomy decompression, a procedure that uses minimally invasive techniques to expand the space in the spine by removing parts of the laminae and foramina within the vertebra.

Degenerative Disc Disease


Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care treats Degenerative disc disease in Manhattan and Flushing Queens. We use state-of-the-art approaches, including nonsurgical and surgical options to relieve pain and other symptoms.

Degenerative disc disease refers to the changes in the spine as a result of the normal aging process. The intervertebral discs act as shock absorbers for the spine. Over time, these natural shock absorbers get worn out and degenerate due to aging, trauma or injury resulting in Degenerative disc disease (DDD). Some people are not aware of their condition until being examined for another health problem.

Traumatic injury, postural strain, repetitive movements, overuse, improper posture or poor body mechanics and being overweight may alter the structure and functioning of the discs. All of these structural changes could place abnormal stress over your spine causing pain.

Disc changes

The normal intervertebral disc is composed of a nucleus pulposus, at the center, surrounded by a fibrous ring known as annulus fibrosus. The nucleus pulposus is a soft jelly-like substance that is well hydrated and responsible for the shock absorbing functionality of the disc. Over time the nucleus pulposus begins to dehydrate and stiffen, failing to provide shock absorber action. While this happens, the height of the disc is reduced and the stress on the surrounding annulus fibrosis is increased, resulting in damage to the annulus. This can cause instability of the spine and can produce pain.

Symptoms

Some individuals with degenerative disc disease may not experience any symptoms, however when symptoms occur they develop gradually and worsen over time. Depending upon the location of the affected disc the condition may cause:

  • Neck or arm pain
  • Back pain
  • Numbness or tingling in the legs
  • Pain in the thighs and buttocks
  • Rarely, bowel and bladder dysfunction

Dr. Joseph Weinstein will diagnose DDD based on your symptoms, medical history and a physical and neurological examination. Your reflexes are evaluated and any muscle weakness, loss of sensation or other signs of neurological injury are noted. Imaging tests such as X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT) scans can help to confirm the diagnosis. X-rays of the spine help to identify the collapsed disc space. Computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans may be used to reveal disc and endplate changes.

Treatment

Degenerative disc disease treatment comprises of non-surgical and surgical treatment options. The non-surgical treatment options include anti-inflammatory and pain medications, muscle relaxants, physical therapy, spinal injections, certain types of braces, and acupuncture. To increase the success of the treatment, your doctor may combine two or more treatment modalities.

Degenerative disc disease surgery is usually considered for patients with unstable spine or neurological dysfunction and persistent pain not responding to non-surgical treatment. Spinal stabilization and fusion may be performed to ease your pain and stabilize the spine.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care specialize in degenerative disc disease treatments in Manhattan and Flushing that can provide relief for your condition, especially if you have experienced symptoms for a longer period of time.

If you'd like to discuss degenerative disc disease treatments and the best course of action to relieve your pain, make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we look forward to helping you!

Herniated Disc


Your spinal discs are made up of several layers: a fibrous outer layer called the fibrous ring, and a soft, jelly-like, inside core called the central pulp.

When a disc is damaged, the soft inside layer can break open and start to bulge out of the outer layer of the disc. This is what is referred to as aherniated disc, and can result in moderate to severe pain. Herniated discs are more common in the lower vertebrae.

If you think you're experiencing symptoms from a herniated disc, you may want to make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care to determine the best course of treatment.

How do I know if I have a Herniated Disc

When the soft, gel-like center of your spinal disc starts to push outward against the disc's outer layer, this causes a bulge, or herniated disc. The condition can cause significant pain, and if some of the fluid from the disc leaks out, that pain can become more intense and start to affect the nerves, causing numbness or sometimes a sharp pain in the extremities.

A herniated disc is caused by a number of different factors, including injury or trauma. When we experience a fall or hard knock, this can impact the spine and cause vertebral compression, which can in turn apply pressure to your spinal discs and form a herniated disc.

In many cases, the natural effects of aging can cause herniated discs. When we get older, we lose some of the fluid in the spinal discs, this fluid gives them less bounce, and leads to weakening of the discs.

Any condition which adds pressure to the spine can cause a herniated disc to form, including obesity, remaining sedentary, lifting heavy items, and repetitive motion.

What is the right treatment for me?

Dr. Joseph Weinstein recommended treatment for a herniated disc can vary depending on the patient's health, age, and the severity of symptoms.

In many cases, the first approach is conservative management of your condition, including applying hot or cold compresses, stretching exercises, and physical therapy. Steroid injections, muscle relaxants, pain medication or anti-inflammatory medication may also help your condition.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein may recommend surgical treatment if symptoms are severe and more conservative approaches do not provide you with enough relief.

Surgical treatments may include alaser discectomy, in which a laser vaporizes a small portion of the gel-like interior of an intervertebral disc to reduce the pressure caused by bulging or herniation.

Another surgical treatment option is amicroendoscopic discectomy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure which removes the damaged or herniated disc material from the spine relieving the pain caused by pressure on the nerve root or spinal cord.

If you'd like to discuss possible treatments and the best course of action to relieve your pain, contact a patient advocate at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we look forward to helping you!

Lower Back Pain


Lower back pain is an incredibly common condition that many people experience at some point in life.

The pain is generally caused by damage or injury to the muscles and ligaments in the back.

If you are experiencing lower back pain and your condition worsens, even after at-home treatments, you might want to consider consulting with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care to determine if further treatment is needed.

How do I know If I have Lower Back Pain?

Lower back pain symptoms may include any of the following:

  • Achy, dull pain
  • Muscle spasms (sometimes severe)
  • Soreness when the area is touched
  • Difficulty moving
  • Pain that travels to the groin or buttocks

Acute lower back pain is most often caused by muscle or ligament strains. Lifting heavy objects or twisting can cause your muscles and ligaments to pull and stretch, or even develop small tears.

Sometimes lower back pain may travel to other areas of the body. When pain travels to the buttocks or legs, for example, you may have developed a condition known as sciatica.

Because the causes of lower back pain can be complex, you should let your doctor know where you are experiencing pain and how severe it is. There are many structures in your spine that can cause pain, and treatment will depend on the history of the pain and any activities that might have made the pain better or worse.

What Is the right treatment for me?

Because lower back pain can be caused by a number of different factors, you will want to consult with your doctor about possible treatments. Many patients may experience relief from more conservative, at-home treatments.

If the pain becomes severe and interferes with your normal, daily activities, you might want to consider consulting with a spine doctor to determine if surgery is necessary for your condition.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care focuses on minimally-invasive and innovative surgical treatment for conditions like lower back pain. While most spinal surgeons continue to treat spinal pain with traditional open surgery, Dr. Joseph Weinstein has spent more than a decade improving minimally invasive techniques, so that our patients can get back to living their lives as quickly as possible.

If you'd like to talk with us about possible treatments or if your symptoms worsen, make an appointment for a consultation with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today. We look forward to helping you!

Myelopathy


Myelopathy Overview

Myelopathy is a general term, referring to any kind of nerve disorder or neurological deficit related to your spine.

When myelopathy occurs because of an accident or some kind of trauma, it is referred to as a spinal cord injury. Myelopathy can also occur as a result of inflammation or circulatory disorder, and may come on gradually. If you have questions about your condition or any symptoms that you might be experiencing, consult with your doctor or make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein to determine the best course of treatment for you.

How do I know If I have Myelopathy?

People with myelopathy may find that they have trouble with activities requiring coordination, like walking downstairs or tying your shoes. It is common to experience issues with finding your balance, walking, or muscle weakness.

Because myelopathy can be caused by a number of different pathologies, the process for determining its origin can be extensive.

In some cases, with a sudden accident or trauma, the onset of the condition can be rapid. In the most common form of myelopathy, cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the symptoms develop more slowly over time, as a result of degeneration and aging. Disorders like osteoporosis can affect the spinal column, and cause myelopathy.

Symptoms may go unnoticed initially, but you should consult your doctor if you start to experience any of the following:

  • Sudden weakness in the muscles
  • Difficulty in finding your balance
  • Problems performing activities that require hand-eye coordination, like tying your shoes

What is the right treatment for me?

The proper treatment for myelopathy depends on its cause.

The most effective treatment for myelopathy is typically by decompressing the spine through surgery. This helps to prevent additional progression of the myelopathy and provide some relief from the symptoms.

There are several surgical procedures used to treat myelopathy, dependent on the location of the symptoms and the condition of the spine. These include:

Laminectomy: removal of the back of one or more vertebrae, which helps to relieve pressure on the nerves.

Laminoplasty: removal of any thickened ligament, which expands the spinal canal and elevates the lamina (the arched portion of the vertebrae that forms the "roof" of the spinal canal)

Discectomy: removal of a herniated disc, to relieve pressure on the nerves

Corpectomy: removal of the damaged part of the vertebra and adjacent discs

If you're experiencing pain or your condition has started to worsen, consult with your doctor, or make an appointment with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care team to discuss the best kind of treatment for you.

Pinched Nerve


pinched nerve is an incredibly common condition that occurs when one of your nerves is compressed.

Nerve compression can happen more often in areas where there is little or no soft tissue protecting your nerves. Our nerves travel throughout our entire body, and when they are in narrow spaces without much tissue protecting them, they’re especially vulnerable and prone to being compressed or “pinched.”

If you have a pinched nerve, you may experience a number of symptoms that can be quite painful at times. While conservative treatments are generally prescribed first, patients with advanced cases may be candidates for minimally invasive surgical treatment.

How do I know if I have a Pinched Nerve?

Sometimes pain may be your only symptom, if you have a pinched nerve. It is also possible to experience other symptoms without any pain, such as:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling, or pins and needles
  • Symptoms that worsen when you move a certain way, like turning your head
  • Weakness
  • A warm or burning sensation

Patients who experience symptoms from pinched nerves should make note of where they are sensing any pain or discomfort. Depending on where the nerve is and how severe the compression is, pain can radiate to other parts of the body. If you experience a pinched nerve in your neck or arm, for instance, you may have symptoms in your hands or fingers.

If nerve compression is left untreated for a long time, the protective area around the nerve could break down, causing fluid to build up or scarring, which can interfere with the nerveメs function.

What Is the right treatment for me?

The treatment for a pinched or compressed nerve depends on the severity of your condition.

In many cases, patients can relieve their symptoms through adequate rest and at-home treatments like hot and cold compresses.

However, if your symptoms worsen, or if you have already attempted more conservative, at-home treatments for your condition, you can make an appointment for a free consultation with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today. Dr. Joseph Weinstein and his team specialize in minimally-invasive surgical procedures to alleviate pain due to spinal conditions.

Sciatica


Sciatica, orlumbar radiculopathy, refers to pain that radiates from the point of pressure on the sciatic nerve down through the legs.

The pain is usually caused by a herniated disc or bone spur applying pressure to the sciatic nerve within the spine. Sciatica pain can range from mild to severe, and can be felt fromthe lower back to the foot.

For severe cases of sciatica, minimally invasive surgery may be necessary to relieve debilitating pain or to prevent the condition from worsening over time.

How do I know If I have Sciatica?

The symptoms of sciatica affect the back, buttocks, hip and leg areas. Pain can be anywhere from mild to severe, and people may experience numbness in the legs or pins and needles.

Most describe radicular pain as a sharp or burning pain that travels down the leg. It is possible for that pain to begin in the low back. Keeping a record of how you're experiencing pain can help to determine where it is originating from and which nerves are being compressed.

It is common to experience sciatica after an injury, and pain can be experienced while performing daily activities, walking, and even while sitting. Common sensations can also include:

  • A burning sensation
  • Numbness in the feet and legs
  • Weakness in the muscles

What is the right Sciatica treatment for me?

Dr. Joseph Weinstein 's recommended treatment for sciatica, or lumbar radiculopathy, can vary depending on the patient's health, age, and the severity of symptoms.

In many cases, the first approach is conservative management of your condition, including plenty of rest combined with applying hot or cold compresses and low-impact exercise like walking or yoga. Steroid injections or anti-inflammatory medication may also help your condition.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein may recommend surgical treatment if symptoms are severe and more conservative approaches do not provide you with enough relief.

Surgical treatments may include microendosopic discectomy, in which a portion of the herniated disc is removed to relieve pressure on the nerve and help with pain.

If you'd like to talk with us about possible treatments for your condition, or if your symptoms worsen after conservative treatment, make an appointment for a free consultation with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care today. We look forward to helping you!

Spinal Stenosis


Spinal stenosis causes chronic pain and other symptoms, becoming much more common with age. Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care treats spinal stenosis in Manhattan and Flushing Queens. We use state-of-the-art approaches, including nonsurgical and surgical options to relieve pain and other symptoms.

Spinal stenosis is a chronic spine condition that develops when the spinal canal becomes narrowed, often pressing on the nerves that travel through the spine and exit through small spaces between the spine bones (vertebrae). Spinal stenosis can occur for different reasons, and it tends to become more common with age.

Causes of spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is much more common among older men and women as age-related changes cause the spine joints (facet joints) to become thicker and the ligaments that help stabilize the spine to become stiffer and less flexible. Settling or gradual compression of the discs can also cause the spinal space to become narrower and more crowded. Spinal stenosis can also occur as a result of the development of bone spurs, tiny overgrowths of bone tissue that grow around the vertebrae and press on the nerves. Less commonly, spinal stenosis can develop in people who have had spine-related injuries or who have tumors in or near the spine.

Symptoms associated with spinal stenosis

The most common symptoms of spinal stenosis include:

  • localized pain in the back or neck
  • pain that radiates into the arms or legs
  • burning, tingling, numbness or weakness in the arms or legs
  • loss of sensation in the arms or legs
  • abnormal reflexes

Some patients with spinal stenosis may find their symptoms are temporarily relieved by leaning forward while sitting down, a position that helps open up the spinal canal and reduce pressure on the nerves.

Spinal stenosis treatment

More mild forms of spinal stenosis may be treated with oral anti-inflammatory medications, sometimes combined with injections of steroid medications around the affected area to help relieve inflammation. Physical therapy may also help in these cases by promoting circulation and healing. When these conservative approaches aren't effective in providing long-term relief, surgery may be recommended to enlarge the spinal canal, especially in the areas where the nerves exit the spine. In these procedures, a small portion of the vertebrae will be removed and a spinal fusion surgery is usually performed to stabilize the area and prevent painful friction.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care specialize in spinal stenosis treatments in Manhattan and Flushing that can provide relief for your condition, especially if you have experienced symptoms for a longer period of time.

If you'd like to discuss spinal stenosis treatments and the best course of action to relieve your pain, make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we look forward to helping you!

Spondylolisthesis


Spondylolisthesisis a spinal disorder caused by a vertebrae slipping forward onto the bone below it.

This condition can occur anywhere along the spine, but is most common in the lower back. The two most common types of spondylolisthesis are degenerative and spondylolytic.

If you are experiencing spondylolisthesis or want to determine the source of your symptoms, you can make an appointment with Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care to consult with us and determine the best course of treatment.

How do I know If I have Spondylolisthesis?

Your spinal vertebrae stay aligned because of the connective tissues and facet joints that surround and support them.

Spondylolisthesis can be caused by a number of different joint issues, including congenital defects, trauma or injury to the joints, overuse, or extra stress on your joints from excess weight.

When vertebral slippage is slight, patients may not experience any symptoms. In many cases, however, spondylolisthesis can cause the following symptoms:

  • Pain, tingling or numbness that radiates down the leg or arm
  • Muscle spasms, especially in the back of the thigh
  • Back or neck pain
  • Issues with mobility, including walking
  • In severe cases, incontinence might occur, if the nerves of the bowels/bladder are affected

What Is the right treatment for me?

The kind of treatment that Dr. Joseph Weinstein recommends for patients experiencing spondylolisthesis can vary, depending on the patient's health, age, and the severity of symptoms.

If you are a patient at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, you will need to undergo a physical exam to test range-of-motion and an x-ray to confirm the extent of vertebral slippage.

The kind of treatment needed is generally based on factors like overall health, age and the severity of symptoms you have experienced.

In many cases, the first approach is conservative management of your condition, including plenty of rest, combined with pain and anti-inflammatory medication. In some cases, a prescription medication may be needed initially to help reduce swelling. Steroid injections may also help your condition. Combining medication and physical therapy can help to stabilize the spinal column and strengthen muscles.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein may recommend surgery if the symptoms are severe and more conservative approaches do not provide you with enough relief.

Surgical treatments may include laminectomy, where a portion of the vertebrae is removed; or spinal fusion, which fuses together sections of the spine to prevent further friction and stabilize the spine.

If you have questions about treating your condition, make an appointment for a consultation with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team to determine the best course of action.

Spondylosis


Spondylosis is a broad term for the normal wearing down of discs in the spine. The condition is very common and affects millions of people in the US per year.

Spondylosis can worsen with age and has often been used to describe degenerative arthritis. The condition can cause pain or muscle spasms in related areas. If spondylosis is severe, it may cause enough pressure on nerve roots to cause paresthesia (pins and needles), and muscle weakness in the limbs.

How do I know If I have Spondylosis?

Spondylosis is a condition that many experience, due to the normal wearing down of the ligaments, tissues and discs in the spine. It is possible that the pain or discomfort you are experiencing is due to spondylosis, but consulting with your doctor about your condition is recommended, especially if your condition worsens.

Many of our patients at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care experience spondylosis. Frequently spondylosis is reported on patients X-rays, without them experiencing any symptoms. X-rays can indicate a decrease in the spinal disc space, calcium deposits in the vertebrae, and any bone fragmentation or spurs all of which might cause our patients pain.

Spondylosis is caused from years of pressure on the spine, poor posture, and normal disc wear and tear. Spondylosis can affect people of all ages, but older people are more prone to the condition because of more limited mobility and flexibility.

Pain, muscle spasms and weakness may come with spondylosis, but further examination should take place to determine the source of pain that you are experiencing.

What is the right treatment for me?

In many cases, there is no specific treatment needed for spondylosis. If you are experiencing pain with the condition, conservative treatments should be considered first, including applying a warm compress, low-impact exercise like walking or yoga, and physical therapy. Pain and anti-inflammatory medication may be prescribed to help reduce swelling. Steroid injections may also help your condition.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein may recommend surgery if the symptoms are severe and more conservative approaches do not provide you with enough relief.

If you have questions about treating your condition, make an appointment for a consultation with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team to determine the best course of action.

Shoulder Osteoarthritis


Shoulder osteoarthritis Overview

Shoulder osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis of the shoulder can severely impact a person's lifestyle.

Causes Ofosteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis commonly develops as a result of the wear and tear of aging. It also frequently results from traumatic injury to the joint. Shoulder osteoarthritis is more common in older people, in women and in people who have occupations that place increased stress on the shoulder. People who have certain diseases, bone deformities or genetic predisposition are also at a higher risk.

Damaging the Cartilage

In a healthy shoulder, the head of the humerus is covered by a layer of cartilage. Healthy cartilage allows the bone the glide smoothly within the joint. But, in the shoulder with osteoarthritis, this cartilage begins to deteriorate and wear away. Repetitive motion or injury may speed this deterioration.

Bone Spurs

Eventually, the bone of the humerus may rub directly against the bone of the shoulder socket. This rubbing can cause the gradual growth of boning bumps along the edge of the joint. This bumps, called bone spurs or osteophytes, can cause joint pain.

Symptoms of Osteoarthritis in the Shoulder

Symptoms of osteoarthritis in the shoulder may include pain in the shoulder and the arm. The movement may increase this pain. The shoulder may feel tender when pressure is applied. The person may experience a grating sensation when moving the arm. The shoulder may feel stiff and this stiffness may interfere with the arm's range of motion.

Osteoarthritis Shoulder Treatment

Treatment options depend on the severity of arthritis. In the early stages, the shoulder may be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. If these methods are not helpful and if the shoulder continues to deteriorate surgery may be needed to repair or replace the joint.

Patellar Tracking Disorder


The patella (kneecap) is held in place by the quadriceps and patellar tendons. Ligaments on either side also help stabilize the patella. Patellar tracking disorder is a painful knee condition caused by a problem with the bones, muscles or ligaments around the patella.

Misalignment

Structural problems in the legs can cause patellar problems to develop. Misalignment of the femur and tibia can cause the kneecap to shift outward. A shallow femoral groove can also cause the patella to slip out of place.

Muscle Imbalance

The four muscles of the quadriceps help guide the patella's movement. Weakness in any of the quadriceps muscles can pull the kneecap to one side. Timing problems between two of the muscles the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) can also cause the patella to shift sideways.

Ligament Damage

If the patella is injured, the lateral retinaculum (a ligament on the outside of the patella) may shrink and tighten. This can pull the kneecap out of its normal track.

Symptoms for Patellar Tracking Disorder

As the patella shifts off its normal track, there is an increased possibility of dislocation (or near dislocation) of the kneecap. The uneven pressure on one side of the kneecap may damage the cartilage under the kneecap, causing pain. This condition is called ELPS (Excessive Lateral Pressure Syndrome).

Patellar Tracking Disorder Treatment

Treatment is usually non-surgical and includes physical therapy to strengthen the quadriceps, stretching exercises for the quadriceps and hamstrings, rest from any aggravating activity, ice, anti-inflammatory medication, and bracing or taping the patella for stabilization. In some cases, minimally invasive knee surgery may be performed to adjust the patella position.

Dislocated Knee


Dislocated Knee Overview

Dislocated knee is an extremely traumatic knee injury, and it is considered to be one of the most serious injuries that can affect this joint. When the knee itself dislocates, that could mean that a lot of soft tissues inside the knee joint get damaged, notably the ACL, the PCL, the meniscus, cartilage, and then more seriously the neurovascular structures.

A dislocated knee is a serious, painful injury that needs immediate medical attention. The long-term consequences are not that dire, but getting through the initial stages is an ordeal for any athlete and those who are nearby when it happens.

The kneecap (patella) sits in a groove at the bottom of the thighbone. It stays in this groove when the knee is bent and acts as a support for the quadriceps muscles that stabilize the leg when it is extended. Any physical activity that involves the lower extremities requires a stable kneecap.

When the kneecap partially moves out of its position, doctors call the condition a subluxation. A partially dislocated kneecap can be the result of a previous dislocation or an inherited tendency for the kneecap to slide to the outside. There could be tenderness under the kneecap and pain when the person twists the knee or climbs stairs. A feeling of the knee's instability is a common complaint. This is because the muscles and ligaments are unable to keep the patella in the femoral groove.

When the kneecap moves all the way out, usually to the outside of the leg, it has been dislocated. The injury can result from a blow to the knee, but it happens more commonly when an athlete performs some kind of twisting motion or change of direction.

Dislocated Kneecap Symptoms

When the kneecap is completely out of the groove:

  • Severe pain, tenderness
  • Immediate swelling
  • The kneecap is visibly displaced, usually to the outside of the knee joint
  • A kneecap that can be moved excessively from side to side (but don't try it)
  • A feeling that your weight cannot be supported
  • Inability to straighten your leg

If you have any questions about a dislocated knee or would like to consult with Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care on your conditions, contact us today to make an appointment!

Knee Arthritis


Overview of Knee Arthritis

Osteoarthritis of the knee, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Knee arthritisis common in the knees because the knees bear the weight of the body. Osteoarthritis of the knee can severely impact a person's lifestyle.

Knee Arthritis Symptoms

Most common knee arthritis symptoms are gradual increase of pain, swelling in the knee, stiffness, popping sound when moving, limited motion of the leg and the knee.

Causes and risk factors

Knee arthritis commonly develops as a result of the wear and tear of aging. It also frequently results from traumatic injury to the joint. Osteoarthritis of the knee is more common in older people, in women, and in people who have occupations that place increased stress on the knees. People who have certain diseases, bone deformities or a genetic predisposition are also at a higher risk. Obesity can also raise a person's risk for osteoarthritis of the knee, because extra body weight increases stress on the knee joints.

Progression

In a healthy knee, the ends of the bones are covered by a layer of cartilage. Healthy cartilage allows the bones to glide smoothly against each other. But in a knee with osteoarthritis, this cartilage begins to deteriorate and wear away. Repetitive motion or injury may speed this deterioration. Eventually, the bones may rub directly against each other.

Bone spur formation

This rubbing can cause the gradual growth of bony bumps along the edge of the joint. These lumps, called bone spurs (or osteophytes), can cause joint pain.

About


About Comprehensive Orthopedic Center in Manhattan & Queens

As the leader in orthopedic medicine and spine surgery, Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care helps alleviate patients who suffer from shoulder, knee and back pain that is often caused by common spinal conditions. Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care provides medical services to people who suffer from various orthopedic conditions. With a dependable treatment solution and a unique plan of care, using allopathic and non-allopathic methods, Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care provides a range of orthopedic services. With two locations in New York, one in Manhattan and one in Flushing, Queens. Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care offers superb orthopedic care.

OUR PRIDE

At Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care, we integrate the delivery of orthopedic healthcare, by combining orthopedic surgery, physical medicine and therapy, and imaging.

Our care plans are individualized and readjusted at each patient visit. This type of customized care is designed with the intention to meet and exceed the needs and expectations of our patients.

In order to provide the most comprehensive orthopedic care, we utilize many of the most prestigious ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals in the Tri-state area.

The level of excellence we achieve in our work is reflected in the five-star reviews on ZocDoc & Healthgrades, the leading healthcare rating company in the United States.

Our founder and leading orthopedic doctor, Dr. Joseph Weinstein, is one of the best shoulder and knee doctors in New York, and a physician with a stellar reputation among his peers and colleagues. His professionalism and expertise have been continually recognized.

OUR MISSION

We believe in exceeding expectations of patient care, by offering preventive coaching, non-surgical rehabilitation, as well as surgical procedures.

We are strongly dedicated to providing superior orthopedic care that improves the quality of our patients lives. We have a vast experience in providing health care to a variety of patients, ranging from professional athletes to active seniors and school-aged children. We believe in honest and open communication as a foundation of building relationships that pave the road to a successful recovery.

We devote our skills, knowledge, and experience to continuously providing comprehensive orthopedic care and treatments while creating the future of global orthopedics through our attentive approach and altruism.

We treat and eradicate all types of knee and shoulder orthopedic conditions as well as spine conditions. We believe that the treatment of various conditions in the body should include traditional allopathic as well as non-allopathic methods. Our services range from conservative management to surgical intervention.

We focus our efforts on educating our patients so that they can thoroughly understand their orthopedic diagnoses and available treatment options. Our goal is to improve the health and well-being of our patients and help them enjoy a healthy and pain-free life after they leave our orthopedic center.

Article


Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care treats spine conditions in Manhattan and Flushing Queens. We use state-of-the-art approaches, including nonsurgical and surgical options to relieve pain and other symptoms.

The human spine combines a framework of interlocking bones and joints which in turn contains and protects the delicate spinal cord and nerves. The spine contains important ligaments, discs, and blood vessels. Problems related to any of these structures can cause pain, numbness, weakness, or loss of function. Joints often succumb to wear and tear (arthritis of the spine), discs can herniate, ligaments can fail, bones can break, and the spinal cord or nerves can get compressed (pinched nerve).

Certain symptoms can distinguish one spinal condition from another. It is important to understand what related symptoms are expected with each spinal condition.

Symptoms of Spinal Conditions

Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care treats patients, not MRI scans. X-rays and MRIs are important when diagnosing spine conditions, but they tell only a small part of the story. An abnormality on an MRI does not necessarily mean it is causing a problem or requires treatment.

The spine is complex and therefore conditions can occur in a myriad of different ways. Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care diagnosis patients thorough understanding of all aspects of the spine, not just the bones and joints. After listening to the patient, and performing a detailed physical examination, can a spine specialist properly understand an MRI or XR. The findings on a radiograph are used in conjunction with each patientメs history and physical exam to ensure the correct diagnosis.

Dr. Joseph Weinstein and the team at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care specialize in spine conditions with treatments that can provide relief for your spine condition, especially if you have experienced symptoms for a longer period of time.

If youメd like to discuss your spinal condition and the best course of action to relieve your pain, make an appointment with us at Comprehensive Orthopedic and Spine Care we look forward to helping you!

Upper East Side New York
1150 Park avenue, , New York, NY 10128
212-858-0766
Rego Park
62-54 97th place, Suite 2C, Rego Park, NY 11374
718-313-0766
Upper East Side New York
1150 Park avenue, , New York, NY 10128
212-858-0766
Rego Park
62-54 97th place, Suite 2C, Rego Park, NY 11374
718-313-0766
0